BISBEE, Ariz. (AP) - The darkest, most violent chapter in the history of Bisbee was an open secret for decades in the funky old Arizona copper town 7 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border.

But few residents knew the details of how about 1,200 miners, most of them immigrants, were pulled violently from their homes a century ago by a private police force and put on cattle cars for their deportation to a desolate area of New Mexico.

Arizona Deportation Documentary
FILE - This May 12, 2019 file shows what's left of the Lavender pit mine outside the southeastern Arizona city of Bisbee, where the copper operation stopped in 1974.The mine and the town are the subject of "Bisbee '17," a story of how some 1,200 miners, most of them immigrants, were pulled violently from their homes in Bisbee by a private police force and put on cattle cars for deportation to a desolate area of New Mexico in 1917. The dark history of Bisbee was largely an open secret for decades in the funky old copper town just seven miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. It's the sixth film of director Robert Greene, who said he learned about the town southeastern Arizona around 15 years ago. (AP Photo/Anita Snow)
AP

The filming of "Bisbee '17," a documentary about what happened July 12, 1917, was a history lesson for residents recruited to play historical figures in the production that weds documentary and collective performance. It is, at turns, a Western, a musical and a ghost story.

"Bisbee '17" will be nationally broadcast for the first time Monday night on the PBS documentary series POV.  In Arizona, it will be shown at 9 p.m.