LOUISVILLE (WHAS11) -- At St. Vincent de Paul's Open Hand Kitchen, there's an open-door policy.

Twelve thousand meals are prepared there every month, lunch and dinner are provided free of charge.

"We come every second Thursday of the month and many of us have probably been doing this for 15 years or more," said volunteer Mimi Leppert.

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The non-profit hasn't seen anyone affected by the partial government shutdown yet, but a former laid-off federal worker, who did not want to be identified, is familiar with asking for help.

"Pray to God. That's all I can say. Pray to God," she said.

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St. Vincent de Paul also operates a food pantry twice a week with a partnership with Dare to Care and the USDA. Their shipment from the government arrives once a month, but if the government shutdown continues into next month, there could be less food to offer.

"If they are not there to inspect the USDA food or to pack up the shipments for our Dare to Care and for our distribution centers, we may not have enough food to feed the people," said Donna Young.

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The food pantry is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

The Open Hand Kitchen is open each day from 12 p.m.-12:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

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For more information on other assistance programs, click here.