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Indiana COVID-19 updates: State reports 1,155 new cases, 11 additional deaths

The Indiana State Department of Health reported that there are more than 1,000 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state, totaling more than 115,000 statewide.

INDIANAPOLIS — This is a liveblog with real-time updates on COVID-19 in Indiana. The Indiana State Department of Health gives daily updates at noon, while Gov. Eric Holcomb and other state officials provide more context every Wednesday at 2:30 p.m.

Friday, Sept. 26

State reports 1,155 new cases, 11 additional deaths                                        

The Indiana State Department of Health reported 1,155 new COVID-19 cases among Indiana residents Saturday, bringing the state's total of positive cases recorded to 116,549.       

Deaths among Hoosiers now total 3,351 with the 11 additional cases recorded between Sept 23 and Friday added to the state's database.

Friday, Sept. 25

The Indiana State Department of Health reported that there are more than 1,000 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state, totaling more than 115,000 cases in the state.

Eighteen more Hoosiers have died from the virus, totaling more than 3,300 deaths. 

Nearly 2 million Hoosiers have been tested.  

Stage 5 changes:

  • A mask mandate will continue.
  • Size limitations will be removed for gatherings and meetings. Organizers of events with more than 500 people will need to submit a written plan to the local health department.
  • Restaurants and bars that serve food can open at full capacity. Appropriate social distancing will need to be maintained. A bar section must have people seated.
  • Bars and nightclubs can open at full capacity. Customers must be seated, and social distancing is required.
  • Indoor and outdoor venues can open at full capacity.
  • Senior centers and congregate nutrition sites may reopen according to FSSA guidance.
  • Personal services, gyms, fitness centers and workout facilities may resume normal operations.
  • Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are required to provide visitation opportunities.

Thursday, Sept. 24

The Indiana State Department of Health reports 920 new COVID-19 cases and 17 more deaths. 

Wednesday, Sept. 23 

State to enter Stage 5 of reopening

Gov. Eric Holcomb and state leaders provided an update on the state response to COVID-19.

The governor said the 7-day positivity rate is hovering around 4 percent, which is a great improvement. The state is also testing around 15,000 people per day.

Holcomb said the state is now ready to enter Stage 5 of the reopening plan. That will begin Saturday Sept. 26 and last through Oct. 17.

Stage 5 changes:

  • A mask mandate will continue.
  • Size limitations will be removed for gatherings and meetings. Organizers of events with more than 500 people will need to submit a written plan to the local health department.
  • Restaurants and bars that serve food can open at full capacity. Appropriate social distancing will need to be maintained. A bar section must have people seated.
  • Bars and nightclubs can open at full capacity. Customers must be seated, and social distancing is required.
  • Indoor and outdoor venues can open at full capacity.
  • Senior centers and congregate nutrition sites may reopen according to FSSA guidance.
  • Personal services, gyms, fitness centers and workout facilities may resume normal operations.
  • Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are required to provide visitation opportunities.

The Indiana State Department of Health reported that there are 728 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state and 10 more deaths. 

The total number of Hoosiers who have contracted the virus is more than 113,000. Total deaths have surpassed 3,300. 

CDC discouraging traditional Halloween trick-or-treating this year due to COVID-19

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued new guidance suggesting that people should avoid traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating for Halloween this year due to the pandemic.

The CDC says that in addition to traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating, many traditional Halloween activities are what they have considered "high risk" for the spreading of viruses: 

  • Having trunk-or-treat events where treats are handed out from trunks of cars lined up in large parking lots.
  • Attending crowded costume parties held indoors.
  • Going to an indoor haunted house where people may be crowded together and screaming.
  • Going on hayrides or tractor rides with people who are not from your household.
  • Using alcohol or drugs, which may cloud your judgment and increase the possibility of risky behavior.
  • Traveling to a rural fall festival that is not in your community if you live in an area with community spread of COVID-19

The CDC says other Halloween activities, can be considered of "moderate risk," but can be mitigated through proper preparation before or additional care following participation in the event.

They are saying that if you participate in any of these activities, you should exercise caution during and after the activity.

These include:

  • Participating in one-way trick-or-treating, where individually-wrapped goodie bags are lined up for families to grab and go while continuing to social distance (such as at the end of a driveway or at the edge of a yard). Those who are preparing the bags should wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds both before and after doing so, the CDC says.
  • Having a small group, outdoor, open-air costume parade where people are distanced more than 6 feet apart.
  • Attending a costume party held outdoors where protective masks are used and people can remain more than 6 feet apart.

    The CDC emphasizes that a Halloween mask is no substitute for a cloth mask. A costume mask should not be used for protection unless it is made of two or more layers of breathable fabric that covers the nose and mouth and does not leave gaps around the face.

    In addition, a costume mask should not be worn over a cloth mask because the combination may make it difficult to breathe. A Halloween-themed cloth mask would be a better substitute in that instance.

  • Going to an open-air, one-way, walk-through haunted forest where appropriate mask use is enforced, and people can remain more than 6 feet apart. If screaming will likely occur, the agency says, greater distancing is advised. The greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus.
  • Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or picking apples, wearing masks is encouraged or enforced, and people are able to maintain social distancing.
  • Having an outdoor Halloween movie night with local family friends, with people spaced at least 6 feet apart. Once again, if screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised. The greater the distance, the lower the risk of spreading a respiratory virus. Lower your risk by following CDC’s recommendations on hosting gatherings or cook-outs.

Low-risk Halloween activities to enjoy the holiday safely

Finally, the CDC says they suggest "low-risk" activities for people to participate in, which will not risk the spread of coronavirus and allow everyone to enjoy the holiday safely.

These lower-risk alternatives include:

  • Carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household and displaying them
  • Carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe distance, with neighbors or friends
  • Decorating your house, apartment, or living space
  • Doing a Halloween scavenger hunt where children are given lists of Halloween-themed things to look for while they walk outdoors from house to house admiring Halloween decorations at a distance
  • Having a virtual Halloween costume contest
  • Having a Halloween movie night with people you live with
  • Having a scavenger hunt-style trick-or-treat search with your household members in or around your home rather than going house to house.

Tuesday, Sept.22

The Indiana State Department of Health is reporting 652 new cases of COVID-19 for a total of 112,626 since the pandemic began. Indiana is approaching 1.9 million tests done with 1,315,440 unique individuals being tested.

The state also reported nine more deaths for a total of 3,295. Another 225 probable deaths have been reported based on clinical diagnoses in patients.

Monday, Sept.21

The Indiana State Department of Health reported 535 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state, totaling more than 112,000 cases in the state.

Seven more Hoosiers have died from the virus.