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Prominent African-American architect receives historical marker for work on local churches, schools

Samuel Plato received a historical marker in front of the Broadway Temple AME Zion Church on 13th and Broadway near downtown Louisville.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – A local architect was honored Sunday for his work on the Broadway Temple AME Zion Church, the James Lee Presbyterian, several buildings for Simmons College and the Virginia Avenue School.

Samuel Plato received a historical marker in front of the Broadway Temple AME Zion Church on 13th and Broadway near downtown Louisville.

Plato was an African-American architect who had a highly successful career in the early 1900s.

He attended Simmons College in west Louisville and lived for a time in Marion, Indiana.

In Marion, he designed the J. Woodrow Wilson house, Platonian Apartments and the First Baptist Church between 1902 to 1919.

He relocated to Louisville in 1920.

Plato was also the first African-American architect to design a U.S. Post Office.

He passed away in 1957.

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