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Cyprus scientist discovers so-called 'deltacron' COVID strain

One investigator challenged the 'deltacron' variant and said it could simply be laboratory contamination.

ATLANTA — It's not something out of a sci-fi movie. It's what health leaders in the European country of Cyprus said is a new strain of COVID-19. Doctors found the so-called 'deltacron' variant in more than two dozen patients over the weekend with combined mutations from both the delta and omicron variants

However, an investigator challenged the 'deltacron' variant and said it could have been from laboratory contamination. 

“Well, It's a cute name. That's not an official name and not what WHO or anybody else is calling it," said Dr. Richard Rothenberg with GSU Public Health. “What it consists of is a virus that appears to have the major characteristics of delta, but it's got about 10 or 12 changes that are associated with omicron."

Yet, scientists in Cyprus believe 'deltacron' is real because of the mutations from both delta and omicron being found in mostly hospitalized patients. 

Now, you may be wondering how 'deltacron' would become an actual variant; that decision usually comes from the World Health Organization.

“If, in fact, it is verified as a new variant, then it will be labeled by WHO with some sort of official designation with some sort of nickname, like delta-omicron, or whatever it might be," Rothenberg said. 

Meanwhile, Dr. Anthony Fauci urged Americans to get vaccinated, so as to lower our vulnerability as COVID-19 continues to evolve.  

“If we had the overwhelming people in this country vaccinated and those who needed to be boosted get boosted, our vulnerability would be much less than it is right now," Fauci said. 

“The long term picture is just really not all that clear," Rothenberg said. "There are some hints as to what may be going on, and I think people should not rush to conclusions and should recognize that this kind of information is going to be forthcoming on a regular basis.”