Outrage on Capital Hill over Pakistan's role in harboring Bin Laden

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by ABC

WHAS11.com

Posted on June 16, 2011 at 9:39 AM

Updated Thursday, Jun 16 at 9:39 AM

(ABC)--Outrage about Pakistan and its role in harboring Osama Bin Laden came to the surface on Capital Hill.

The US sends billions of dollars in aid to Pakistan each year leaving many questioning why the government sends aid to a country detaining US informants.

For the crew of the USS Carl Vinson who buried Osama Bin Laden at sea it was a relief-filled homecoming.

"I was scared for all of their lives. I knew they were going to be a marked ship," one family member said as she waited to see her sailor.

For the informants who helped the CIA hunt down the Al Qaeda leader, it was another story.

The man who owned the safe house the CIA used to monitor Bin Laden: Detained. The man who reported those coming and going to the secret compound: Also detained - by the Pakistani government, supposedly a US ally.

That prompted the understatement of the day. Jay Carney

"Our relationship with Pakistan is extremely important. It is also complicated," Jay Carney, White House spokesperson, said.

On Capitol Hill, there was outrage.

"How long do we support governments that lie to us?" Patrick Leahy said.

"Most governments lie to each other. That's the way business gets done," defense secretary Robert Gates said.

"Do they also arrest the people that help us when they say they are allies?" Leahy asked.

"Sometimes. And sometimes they send people to spy on us and they're our close allies," Gates responded. "So, that's the real world that we deal with."

Rooting out the enemy in Pakistan may now be harder than ever.

"If the United States doesn't have local Pakistani informants, then it's going to be very, very difficult for the United States to stage operations inside Pakistan. And that's exactly what the Pakistani government wants." former National Security official Richard Clarke said.

With the U-S handing over control of the war in neighboring Afghanistan by 2014, Gates said, there is an end in sight.

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