Report: Toyoda leaving for U.S. Saturday

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Associated Press

Posted on February 20, 2010 at 4:04 AM

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota isn't commenting on a published report that the company's president will leave for the U.S. Saturday.

Akio Toyoda has agreed to appear before a congressional committee next Wednesday to discuss the company's massive recalls and safety issues.

Japan's industry and transport ministers have publicly applauded the decision, saying that Toyoda should take the opportunity to help reassure customers.

Japan's Foreign Minister tells reporters he hopes "Toyota will soon regain the trust of their customers around the world."

The nation's Economy, Trade and Industry Minister says the automaker's problems shouldn't become "a political matter between the Japanese and U.S. governments."

Toyota has pledged full cooperation with investigations by the U.S. National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration and Congress and promised upgrades to help prevent future problems.

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<<CUT …074 (02/19/10)>> 00:27 "''

Ross Simpson

The president of Toyota has agreed to testify next week before a House coommittee about his company's massive recalls. AP Correspondent Ross Simpson reports.

<<CUT …075 (02/19/10)>> 00:18 "at highway speeds"

Ross Simpson

AP Correspondent Ross Simpson reports the decision to testify comes at a critical time.

<<CUT …076 (02/19/10)>> 00:14 "not a problem"

Ross Simpson

AP Correspondent Ross Simpson reports an expert believes it's time for the president of Toyota to come clean about massive recalls.

<<APPHOTO KYER103 (02/18/10)>>

: The open letter that was sent to Toyota owners is displayed in the visitor center at the Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky plant in Georgetown, Ky., Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010.

<<APPHOTO TOK802 (02/19/10)>>

: Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda speaks to journalists in Nagoya, central Japan, Friday morning, Feb. 19, 2010. Toyoda said he would testify at a U.S. congressional hearing next week about the automaker's massive recalls in the United States.

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