Legislation proposed to protect children from liquid nicotine

Legislation proposed to protect children from liquid nicotine

Legislation proposed to protect children from liquid nicotine

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by Web Update Producer

University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Posted on July 28, 2014 at 3:58 PM

 CLEVELAND -- With a 300 percent increase in accidental poisonings due to liquid nicotine in 2013 alone, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) today announced a plan to protect children from accidental poisonings and death from liquid nicotine. Marketed with flavors and names appealing to kids such as “Cotton Candy,” “Fruity Loops,” and “Gummi Bear,” Senator Brown has introduced legislation calling for the FDA to  regulate the marketing of these small containers of liquid nicotine. While children are protected from bleach, aspirin, and mouthwash with child-proof packaging, the Senator's legislation calls for the Consumer Product Safety Commission to mandate liquid nicotine packages become child resistant. 

"Children who might be attracted to the flavors and the way the bottle looks will at least not be able to, if they're small children, will not be able to open these bottles," says Senator Brown.

"A standard-sized eye dropper of the liquid nicotine," says Lolita McDavid, MD, Medical Director of Children Advocacy and Protection at UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, "would be enough to kill four toddlers." Dr. McDavid joined Senator Brown from the emergency department of University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital where Brown announced that he is cosponsoring the Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act. 

"This is frightening to us from the poison center stand point," says Henry Spiller, Director of the Central Ohio Poison Center for Nationwide Children’s Hospital, also at the announcement. Senator Brown's legislation gives the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission authority and direction to issue rules requiring safer, child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine products within one year of passage. 

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