Fear is not the way to live: Council members respond to violent night

Louisville Metro Police are looking for answers and suspects after a series of shootings in the community on Nov. 14.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) – One murder, four shootings and still multiple people recovering in the hospital. 

 

It was a wild night for LMPD on Monday, responding to a handful of shootings where no arrests have been made.  

 

The uptick in violence in such a short amount of time has us asking city leaders, where do we go from here? 

 

"If government can't provide safety for its citizens then government has a problem," Metro Councilman David James said.

 

From two teenagers being shot in neighborhoods to a man and woman found shot in a car outside the Family Dollar on Algonquin and Winkler Avenue, where we're told the man later died from his injuries.

 

James responds, "I think the men and women of the police department are working really hard to do what they can but there are some changes that need to be made and they need more officers."

 

James represents areas that have seen more than 2 dozen homicides so far this year.

 

"We as an entire city have to decide that this entire city has a problem if one part of the city has a problem. We need to put the resources necessary to do a holistic approach and look at what it is that we're not doing right."  

 

James says everyone must look from within for solutions.

 

He says parents at home can do more to keep their children out of trouble, JCPS can do more and so can police. 

 

James and fellow council member Jessica Green say while more patrols were beefed up in the Highlands after a recent murder, the same needs to happen west of 9th street.

 

"My heart is definitely with those folks in the Highlands, but this is something that people here, down here in West Louisville – it’s becoming all too commonplace," Green said.

 

Chief Conrad is defending his staff on Facebook, saying his department did not handle the Highlands murder any differently, citing the almost $1.8 million that’s being invested into overtime patrols in neighborhoods where more homicides occur.

 

Those council members say the concern they hear from their residents is real and living in fear is not what the good people in Louisville deserve.

The Metro is closing in on 100 homicides for 2017.

 

Here is the full Facebook post from Chief Steve Conrad posted Monday, Nov. 14:

 

 

 

 

© 2017 WHAS-TV


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