Groundbreaking kicks off final phase of Parklands at Floyds Fork project

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by Claudia Coffey

WHAS11.com

Posted on July 3, 2013 at 5:46 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 3 at 6:01 PM

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) -- The parks system in Metro Louisville is about to get bigger after a groundbreaking Tuesday for the final phase of the Parklands of Floyds Fork project.

Nearly 4,000 acres will be developed with something unique for every kind of outdoor enthusiast.

"It's unbelievable, it's unbelievable. It's like hitting the lottery," mountain biker Billy Davis said.

The ambitious $35,000,000 project encompasses more than 2,400 acres in Southeastern Jefferson County near Seatonville Road along Floyds Fork. It's something expected to attract people from across the region and country.  

"There's not only going to be natural surface trails for mountain biking and trail running and hiking, but also a mountain bike park which is unique in the United States," Davis said.

Beyond mountain biking, there is a little something for every interest level. When everything is finished, there will be a mountain biking trail, picnic area, splash park and even a fishing pond.

"These are places of recreation and fun but they are also about shaping the city as it grows," Dan Jones, founder and 21st Century Parks CEO, said.

The final phase will complete the 4,000 acre vision of Parklands and protect the land along Floyds Fork, making it the largest development of a park system since Olmsted.

"Sometimes we say at 21st Century Parks that our primary mission is to build a systemic world class edition to Louisville’s park system, but if we do it right Louisville will have the finest urban edge in the country," Jones said.
 
Neighbors around the final construction area said they are thrilled with the project and that the land around them will be protected for their children and grandchildren.

"I think it's great. We need more of that for the children. I think it's great," Janet Pfeister said.

The final phase is expected to be complete by 2015.  The project is being paid for with a combination of federal dollars and private donations.

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