Community holds vigil to honor victims of Wis. Sikh temple shooting

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by Chelsea Rabideau

WHAS11.com

Posted on August 8, 2012 at 12:20 PM

Updated Wednesday, Aug 8 at 6:27 PM

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Wednesday afternoon, the Sikh community remembered victims of the shooting at a temple in Wisconsin with a vigil. The purpose - to show compassion and solidarity.

They gathered in silence. People from all religions and walks of life, coming together to honor those gunned down in the shooting.

“Honor their memory, but also, make a commitment of working to reduce violence and hatred and misunderstanding,” Terry Taylor, the executive director of Interfaith Paths2Peace, said.

Several LMPD officers attended the vigil as well.

“Louisville, knock on wood, has received recognition internationally as being a compassionate city,” Taylor said. “When things like this happen, one of the things that’s really remarkable is how our community and all of our religious leaders come together and stand in solidarity with people who are suffering.”

Louisville professor and leader in the Sikh community Dr. Daya Singh Sandhu said he’d often heard that Louisville was a compassionate city. But, those were just words, until now.
“Attending this candlelight vigil has really proven that not only in words, but also in action,” Dr. Sandhu said. "The city of Louisville is truly a compassionate city.”

Sandhu said there are about 100 families in Kentucky that practice Sikh and they often feel alone and misunderstood.

Taylor said  he believes that lack of understanding is what can lead to violence.

“Sadly, this is necessary because there are disturbed individuals here and there around our country who take up weapons and decide that whatever their differences are with other people or people who are different from them, the way to solve that is to kill them,” he said.

But, with their silence, those attending the vigil vowed to make a change.

The Sikh community gathers to worship every Sunday morning at 10:30 at the one and only temple in Louisville. They invite anyone to join them.

Click here for more information about the Sikh religion.

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