Lifesaving device invented in S. Indiana getting national attention after weekend deaths

A lifesaving device invented in Southern Indiana is getting national attention after two deaths over the weekend.

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) -- A lifesaving device invented in Southern Indiana is getting national attention after two deaths over the weekend.

Both people died after being electrocuted by underwater currents. The inventors of "ShockAlarm" say that should never happen and they have the technology to ensure it doesn't.

The incidents happen quick, as undetected electrical current races through the water, shocking unsuspecting swimmers and sometimes killing them.

Over the weekend, officials report an 11-year-old New Jersey girl was playing with her friends on a raft when the inflatable toy touched a metal boat lift.  All three girls were shocked and one of them died.

The day before, a 19-year-old Ohio man died after jumping in the water to save his dad and dog, who were both being shocked by an underwater electrical current.

"Electricity and water simply don't mix and I think that's why we're seeing an increase in issues,” Jyll Stuart, Managing Partner at ShockAlarm LLC, said.

Stuart and the team at Jeffersonville-based ShockAlarm said the incidents could and should have been avoided.

"We have smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, I think it’s just a natural evolution having a detector like this,” Stuart said.

The battery-operated device was invented to notify swimmers of electrical current. It’s light weight, and easy to use by removing a magnet from the front of the device and then putting it in the water.

Stuart said, "Its instantaneous because it is constantly checking, and as soon as it detects something it is going to flash a light and sound an alarm."

Made to sit in any body of water, it can be tethered to a dock, boat, or even float in a pool- all areas that could prove dangerous and ultimately deadly.

"There's no reason this should happen so they devised the shock alarm devise that constantly monitors the water for dangerous activity that could lead to electric shock drowning,” Stuart said.

She calls it a lifesaver, and the high demand for the product since the weekend deaths show others hope it could be theirs.

You can purchase a ShockAlarm here.

 

© 2017 WHAS-TV


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