Are spelling skills suffering as technology advances?

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by Michelle Arnold

WHAS11.com

Posted on May 31, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Updated Thursday, May 31 at 10:43 PM

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) -- Pikeville Kentucky 6th-grader Emily Keaton generated lots of buzz after making it to the semifinals in the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

All this spelling has people asking, have auto-correct and spell check caused us to misspell more words?

“Everything is in a little blurb or everything’s in a blog or in a tweet so what happens is we don't really focus on spelling as much in our own personal communication as much as we used to,” said Bowen Elementary Principal Steve Tyra.

Tyra says school curriculums across the nation noticed this problem and spelling as a subject is experiencing a rebirth.
 
“It's a major part of what we are doing with kids, making sure they know spelling patterns and correct spelling with all their work,” said Tyra. “If we haven't taught it, it becomes a real weakness for the person and it does affect their employment.”

Spelling errors definitely grab your attention. On Tuesday Mitt Romney's camp encouraged supporters to download a campaign app that allows users to post photos of themselves with the slogan "A Better America." But America was spelled ‘Amercia’. The typo was all over the web within minutes.

“Every error that you make diminishes what you're trying to say,” said Tyra.

Emily Keaton was eliminated on Thursday in the semifinals. She made it to the final 50. Snigdha Nandipati, 14, of San Diego, won the 85th Scripps National Spelling Bee.

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