Ebola Patient Dr. Kent Brantly Says 'God Saved My Life'

Ebola Patient Dr. Kent Brantly Says 'God Saved My Life'

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Ebola Patient Dr. Kent Brantly Says 'God Saved My Life'

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by ABC NEWS

WHAS11.com

Posted on August 21, 2014 at 5:59 AM

Updated Thursday, Aug 21 at 11:33 AM

(ABC NEWS) -- Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantly have been cured of the Ebola virus and released from Emory Hospital in Atlanta.

Brantly, 33, called his recovery "a miraculous day."

"I am thrilled to be alive, to be well, and reunited with my family," he said.

He also told a news conference at Emory Hospital that "God saved my life."

Both patients were given blood and urine tests to determine whether they still had the virus, Emory doctors said in a statement released this morning.

"After a rigorous course of treatment and testing we have determined, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and state health departments, that (Brantley) has recovered from the Ebola Virus Disease and he can return to his family, to his community, and to his life without any public health concerns," Dr. Bruce Ribner, director of Emory’s Infectious Disease Unit, said today.

Brantly said that when Writebol left the hospital on Tuesday, she asked him to speak on her behalf ot the public and express gratitude for prayers on her behalf.

"When she walked out of the room, all she could say was ‘To God be the glory,’" Brantly recalled. "Nancy and (her husband) David are now spending some much needed time together."

Writebol's husband said in the statement that Writebol left the hospital in a "significantly weakened condition."

Brantly is expected to give a statement today.

Brantly contracted the deadly virus while working in a Liberian Ebola ward with the aid agency Samaritan’s Purse. He was evacuated to the U.S. earlier this month along with Writebol.

Brantly is slated to speak at a press conference today, with an update about Writebol also planned.
Brantly is the first-ever Ebola patient to be treated in the U.S. and the first human to receive the experimental serum known as ZMapp.

According to reports, Brantly’s condition deteriorated so quickly that doctors in Africa decided to give him the drug in a last-ditch effort to save him.

Brantly’s condition started to improve dramatically within an hour after getting the serum, according to Samaritan’s Purse, but it’s unclear if the improvement was directly related to the medication. After his health stabilized, Brantly was evacuated on a specially outfitted plane to Atlanta in early August to the hospital isolation ward.

Writebol, 59, also survived after getting the serum.

The virus has killed at least 1,229 and sickened 1,011 more, according to numbers released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have the most cases.

With reporting by ABC's Sydney Lupkin.

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