New bills aims to crack down on dog fighting

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by Chelsea Rabideau

WHAS11.com

Posted on March 6, 2014 at 12:50 AM

Updated Thursday, Mar 6 at 1:01 AM

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Law enforcement does everything possible to stop dog fighting. They bring in national experts on the subject, take classes, and learn new methods to spot signs of dog fighting. But, it’s still an incredibly difficult crime to prove. House Bill 408 would give officers another tool to crack down on blood sports.

Hopping in on three legs, a happy dog visited the state capitol. He’s a far cry from how he was found last summer, duct taped and chained to a fence in Louisville, neglected, scarred, and in pain. “We had to reattach his jaw, amputate his leg, and he had over 50 puncture wounds on him,” said Rebecca Eaves, president and founder of The Arrow Fund, a group that takes in emergency cases of neglect and abuse.

The Arrow Fund named the dog Frodo. He was the victim of horrible abuse and his injuries pointed to a history of being used in dog fights. But, prosecuting the people responsible for such cruelty is no easy task. “It’s a very organized underground dog fighting crime, so you don’t come across it. A lot of time, you’ll find trafficking drugs out in the open. You can’t do that with dog fighting because it’s so violent, people know citizens will call on it,” LMPD Officer Lisa Nagle explained.

The world of blood sports is a clandestine, secretive sub-culture. “There’s a lot of dog fighting, people don’t realize it. The citizens of our community and the state of Kentucky don’t realize how bad a crime that it is,” said Officer Nagle.

Frodo is now the spokesdog for House Bill 408, which would make it a felony to own dogs for the purpose of fighting them. “HB 408 would be such a tool for law enforcement to get these people before, to shut down dog fighting. Right now, dog fighting, you need to catch them in the act of fighting and that’s very hard. Kentucky needs this HB 408 to pass,” said Eaves.

Kentucky is the only state without a law like this one. “If we can get the possession with the intent to fight, then that gives us more room for probable cause to actually do search warrants on a  number of individuals in Louisville,” Officer Nagle explained.

Because of his extremely violent past, Frodo will never be put up for adoption. He’s in the care of The Arrow Fund. The Humane Society is offering $5,000 to anyone with information that could lead to the conviction of those responsible for hurting Frodo.
 

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