Ind. House looks to advance two gun measures

Ind. House looks to advance two gun measures

Credit: Getty Images

DALLAS, TX - JANUARY 19: A detail view of pistols that were turned in during a gun buy back program at the First Presbyterian Church of Dallas on January 19, 2013 in Dallas, Texas. The gun buy back program has collected and destroyed over 400 pistols, rifles, shotguns and semi-automatic assault weapons since its inception. U.S. President Barack Obama recently unveiled a package of gun control proposals that include universal background checks and bans on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

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by ASSOCIATED PRESS

WHAS11.com

Posted on February 28, 2014 at 1:54 PM

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -- The Indiana House has advanced a measure allowing judges to impose tougher sentences for anyone convicted of using a gun in a violent crime.
 
   The House approved a proposal from Republican Sen. Jim Merritt of Indianapolis that would allow a court to add between five and 20 years to a sentence in a violent gun crime.
 
   The measure would also make it illegal to provide a gun to someone who plans to commit a crime.
 
   House members amended the bill Thursday to also establish a study committee that would review ways to reduce gun violence across Indiana. The Senate earlier approved a similar version of the bill.

   House lawmakers are also advancing legislation that would allow parents to keep guns in their cars while parked on school grounds.
 
   The House took up a broad-based Senate measure dealing with gun laws Thursday. The Senate plan would reduce the penalties for having a gun in school parking lots. It also would make it legal to keep guns in vehicle's glove compartments.
 
   The measure encountered some opposition earlier in the session, but won support in a House committee last week.
 
   Supporters of the plan say it will help parents who have inadvertently been breaking the law for years when they drive to school with guns in their cars. Opponents say it would increase the chance of gun violence at schools.

 

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