Gibson’s first trial granted continuance from June to September

Print
Email
|

by WHAS11

WHAS11.com

Posted on May 7, 2013 at 6:15 PM

FLOYD CO., Ind. (WHAS11) -- Christine Whitis is one of three women William Clyde Gibson is accused of killing. The trial start date for Whitis’ murder was continued for the third time, pushed from June 24 to September 23.

“I think about this every hour. Everything in my life relates back to my mother,” Mike Whitis, the son of Christine Whitis, said. “There is not a day that goes by that I don’t think about her.”

Gibson’s attorney filed for the continuance of the trial on May 1. The prosecution says they are ready to go to trial immediately and objected to the motion in a pretrial conference on Tuesday.

“It’s just a tough thing for [the victims’ family],” Floyd County Chief Deputy Prosecutor Steve Owen said. “They have emotions that they are trying to deal with. They are looking for the criminal justice system to provide then with some sort of comfort.”

Gibson’s attorney, J. Patrick Biggs, did not want to comment to reporters after the conference about the continuance. But Owen believes Biggs is using the continuance as a stalling technique. Biggs told the court Tuesday he needed more time to find witnesses and review evidence.

It has been more than a year since Gibson was arrested for the murders of Christine Whitis, whose body was found mutilated in the garage of Gibson’s New Albany home. Gibson is also charged for the murder of Karen Hodella, who was found stabbed to death in Clarksville near the Ohio River in 2002. He is also facing murder charges for Stephanie Kirk, whose body was found buried in Gibson’s backyard after his arrest. The Kirk murder trial is scheduled for Jan. 20, 2014 and the Hodella trail date has not been set yet.

Floyd Superior Judge Susan Orth said in court Tuesday she granted the continuance because Gibson’s trial is a capital case and wants to ‘lower opportunity for error.’

“You keep hoping something is going to happen,” said Mike Whitis. “Then getting [the trial] delayed keeps the family in limbo.”

 

Print
Email
|