Bees make hive in woman's home

Bees make hive in woman's home

Bees make hive in woman's home

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by Barry Davis

WHAS11.com

Posted on July 16, 2014 at 8:47 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jul 16 at 8:47 PM

(KENS5)-- Suzanne Jordan loves the fact she lives in a home which was built in the 1800's. Over the years she's tried to fix it up and make it "her home," but living on disability makes the progress very slow. While she has been making improvements, the house has become a home to others as well.

 
One day, three years ago Jordan was walking along the side of the house and noticed some bees flying around. She says she saw them fly toward the house but they didn't fly away. When she walked up closer to where she last saw the bees, Jordan noticed they were flying in and out of one of her walls.
 
"If you put your ear close to the wall, the Sheetrock it sounds like running water," Jordan said.
 
It's not water rushing inside her walls, it's thousands of bees making a hive. This year Jordan says there just got to be too many of them, so she called around to try to find someone to relocate the hive.
 
"Everyone I spoke with wanted to kill the bees" said Jordan.
 
The self-described environmentalist didn't want the bees killed, she wanted to save the colony and have them moved.
 
"You see all these programs about them being endangered, we need bees," Jordan said.
 
After she called KENS 5, we made a few phone calls and found someone who said they would come in and try to save the bees. We met Craig Jackson at Jordan's home the next day. Jackson assessed the situation and said he believed he would be able to harvest the bees and move them to a new location. We set a date to meet back at the home a few days later.
 
The following Monday we met Jackson back at Jordan's home. He furnished us with special suits, which were supposed to prevent the bees from stinging us. After suiting up, Jackson, Barry Davis and Mike Humphries our photographer went inside. As soon as Jackson began cutting into the wall the bees went on the offensive.
 
While the goal was to safely relocate the bees, the game plan quickly changed. Jackson said the bees were too aggressive, they were "Africanized" or cross bred with killer bees.
 
They were so aggressive, despite being in a special suit our photographer was stung possibly as many as a dozen times.
 
Jackson said he had no choice but to exterminate the hive. After cutting open the wall and making sure he removed all the honeycomb, Jackson brought out a device which sprayed a poison powder, killing the bees.
 
He said he would have to wait a day or two, so the bees which were out in the field working during that day, would come back. He then returned and killed the remaining bees.
 

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