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Wednesday's potpourri of interesting weather things

Wednesday's potpourri of interesting weather things

by Ben Pine

WHAS11.com

Posted on August 22, 2012 at 7:22 AM

A former coworker of mine sent me this picture today, as you can see this news van was in the wrong place, at the wrong time - getting hit by lightning even with the mast down.  Look closely at the right side and top of the van.

New photos have popped up of the March 2nd tornado crossing the Ohio River.  Some people think tornadoes won't cross rivers or valleys, well, here's proof that they do.

This was an update from the National Weather Service in Louisville,

"We recently received photos of the March 2 southern Indiana EF-4 tornado as it crossed the Ohio River from Jefferson County to Trimble County.  Many thanks to Wayne Mahoney and Ginger Richardson for sharing these with us!"

Next, the 9th named storm of the Atlantic Hurricane season is Isaac.  Right now, it's a weak tropical storm, but could become a hurricane by tomorrow.  What makes Isaac so interesting, is the storm path - possibly heading towards Florida by late weekend into early next week.  More info.

Next...There are currently 42 wildfires burnings out west.  How do wildfires get their names?



From the National Weather Service, "Every year in California thousands of wildfires start throughout the state. In most cases, the dispatch center sending the initial resources to a wildland fire will designate a name for the fire, but the first on scene engine or fire official can also name the incident. Fires are usually named for the area in which they start a geographical location, local landm
ark, street, lake, mountain, peak, etc. Quickly naming the fire provides responding fire resources with an additional locator, and allows fire officials to track and prioritize incidents by name.  For example during the Southern California Fire Siege of 2003, the largest wildland fire in California history, the Cedar Fire in San Diego County, was named after the Cedar Creek Falls area where it started."

 

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