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Major radar upgrade coming to Louisville!

Major radar upgrade coming to Louisville!

by Ben Pine

WHAS11.com

Posted on September 20, 2012 at 7:22 AM

Soon, meteorologists around Kentuckiana will be able to see precipitation of all types with much higher definition.  The advancement of radar technology called Dual Polarization Radar will greatly improve our ability to identify different types of precipitation and how much of it is falling. 

Louisville National Weather Service says, "This much anticipated upgrade is part of the NWS vision to build a Weather-Ready Nation to better protect lives and livelihoods. This exciting upgrade will incorporate a new technology called dual-polarization, or dual-pol. This new technology will result in 14 new radar products that will enable us to continue providing our suite of high quality products and services to the public. This new technology and data will primarily help forecasters identify the type of precipitation that is falling as well as improve rainfall estimates"

The Dual Polarization Story from our local National Weather Service.

What is Dual Polarization?

"Current NWS Doppler radars transmit and receive pulses of radio waves in a horizontal orientation. As a result, the radar only measures the horizontal dimensions of targets (e.g. cloud and precipitation droplets). Dual-polarimetric radar transmits and receives pulses in both a horizontal and vertical orientation. Therefore, the radar measures both the horizontal and vertical dimensions of targets. Since the radar receives energy from horizontal and vertical pulses, we can obtain better estimates of the size, shape, and variety of targets. It is expected that this will result in significant improvements in the estimation of precipitation rates, the ability to discriminate between precipitation types (e.g. hail vs. rain), and the identification of non-meteorological returns, such as chaff, ground clutter, and smoke plumes from wildfires that are not uncommonly detected by weather radar systems such as WSR-88D." - National Weather Service

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