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Expanded gambling foes say Beshear has given up on bill

Expanded gambling foes say Beshear has given up on bill

Gambling

by Joe Arnold

WHAS11.com

Posted on February 1, 2012 at 8:47 AM

(WHAS11) -- After Governor Steve Beshear (D-Kentucky) lashed out at Senate President David Williams (R-Burkesville) on Tuesday, accusing him of trying to intimidate would-be supporters of an expanded gambling amendment, a group opposed to the bill said Beshear's comments indicate he has "given up" on the effort.

"You don't insult the head of the chamber you're counting on to pass your bill unless you have already given up on it yourself," said Martin Cothran, spokesman for the Family Foundation. "If there was any doubt that the gambling bill was already dead, his comments today should have settled it."

In a news release, Cothran also said that the delayed introduction of the measure also indicates its failure.

"The Governor is trying to shift blame from his own inept handling of the now doomed gambling bill so that he can blame it on someone else," Cothran said.

In comments to reporters, Beshear said he has spoken with a number of senators, and acknowledged that the legal wrangling over redistricting and the candidate filing deadline had affected the timing of the amendment.  Yet, the governor added that there was still time for the measure to be approved.

Beshear calle the threat of a Frankfort minister to file an ethics complaint against the amendment's likely sponsor, Sen. Damon Thayer (R-Georgetown) a "cheap shot" that was further evidence of intimidation tactics by Williams.

“You know, this amendment is not a contest between Senator Williams and me," Beshear said. "That contest was decided back on November the eighth, and we won that contest decidedly from the people of this state. What is a contest is between apparently Senator Williams and 80 percent of the Kentuckians across the state who want to vote on this. And I’m hoping that 80 percent of the Kentuckians win that contest.”

“Governor, no one likes a poor winner and that’s what he's turned out to be,” Williams said.


 

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